• Neural networks are machine learning algorithms inspired by the brain.
  • High temperatures in 2014 helped contribute to the California drought.
  • Computer scientists at the University of Alberta have written an effectively unbeatable algorithm for heads-up limit hold’em.
  • A linear correlation equal to 0.804 suggests that 65% of the differences in cancer risk among different tissues can be explained by the total number of stem cell divisions in those tissues.  Thus, the stochastic effects of DNA replication appear to be the major contributor to cancer in humans. (Tomasetti & Vogelstein, 2015)
  • New research lends credence to the popular notion that staying warm will help you avoid catching the common cold.
  • Staphylococcus aureus surrounding a white blood cell (4).
  • Bacteria shown on the left are pre-treatment; bacteria on the right have been exposed to the treatment and are dead (1).
Neural networks are machine learning algorithms inspired by the brain.

Neural Networks Rival the Primate Brain at Object Recognition

A central problem in computer vision is that of designing algorithms that can competently accomplish tasks that humans can easily do, such as recognizing objects. Recently, neuroscientists at MIT found that the latest artificial deep neural networks (DNNs) are able to rival the performance of the primate brain at this […]

High temperatures in 2014 helped contribute to the California drought.

2014: The Hottest Year Yet

The past year was the hottest on record since at least 1891, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) announced on January 5th. The JMA reports that the average temperature was 0.27°C warmer than the 1981 to 2010 baseline average. (1) This finding was not unexpected. In December 2014, the United Nations’ […]

Computer scientists at the University of Alberta have written an effectively unbeatable algorithm for heads-up limit hold’em.

Computer Science Researchers Devise Hold ‘em Algorithm

Computer science researcher Michael Bowling and his colleagues at the University of Alberta, along with Finnish software developer Oskari Tammelin, have devised an algorithm to solve a variant of poker called heads-up limit hold’em (HULHE) (1). The authors’ strategy plays HULHE so flawlessly “as to render pointless further work on […]

A linear correlation equal to 0.804 suggests that 65% of the differences in cancer risk among different tissues can be explained by the total number of stem cell divisions in those tissues.  Thus, the stochastic effects of DNA replication appear to be the major contributor to cancer in humans. (Tomasetti & Vogelstein, 2015)

Cancer: A Manifestation of “Bad Luck”?

A positive correlation between random mutations in replicating cells and the onset of adult cancer was found at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer by Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein. That “bad luck”—that is, random mutations during DNA replication, environmental factors, and genetic disposition–contributes to cancer incidence is a well-known fact […]

New research lends credence to the popular notion that staying warm will help you avoid catching the common cold.

Common Cold Thrives in Colder Environments

Physicians have historically attributed the common cold to viral infections transmitted through the nose or mouth rather than cold weather. Prior research has in fact demonstrated that cold temperatures do not inhibit the rhinovirus, the major virus behind the common cold (1). So why does winter hail a greater propensity […]

Staphylococcus aureus surrounding a white blood cell (4).

New Antibiotic Suggests Novel Approach to Combating Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

Drug-resistant bacteria infect two million people per year, and are capable of developing resistance to antibiotics faster than the scientific community can create new drugs (1). Professors Kim Lewis and Slava Epstein at Northeastern University, and colleagues from University of Bonn, NovoBiotic Pharmaceuticals, and Selcia Limited have made breakthroughs that […]

Bacteria shown on the left are pre-treatment; bacteria on the right have been exposed to the treatment and are dead (1).

Bacterial Communication Used to Kill Cancer

A recent study conducted at the University of Missouri indicates that a bacterial communication system may be used to kill cancer cells. Bacterial populations communicate through a process called quorum sensing (QS). In QS, bacteria secrete signaling molecules called autoinducers. Based on the type of autoinducer secreted, bacteria can escape […]

 

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Most Recent

Neural Networks Rival the Primate Brain at Object Recognition

Neural networks are machine learning algorithms inspired by the brain.

A central problem in computer vision is that of designing algorithms that can competently accomplish tasks that humans can easily do, such as recognizing objects. Recently, neuroscientists at MIT found that the latest artificial deep neural networks (DNNs) are able to rival the performance of the primate brain at this […]

 
 

2014: The Hottest Year Yet

High temperatures in 2014 helped contribute to the California drought.

The past year was the hottest on record since at least 1891, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) announced on January 5th. The JMA reports that the average temperature was 0.27°C warmer than the 1981 to 2010 baseline average. (1) This finding was not unexpected. In December 2014, the United Nations’ […]

 
 

Computer Science Researchers Devise Hold ‘em Algorithm

Computer scientists at the University of Alberta have written an effectively unbeatable algorithm for heads-up limit hold’em.

Computer science researcher Michael Bowling and his colleagues at the University of Alberta, along with Finnish software developer Oskari Tammelin, have devised an algorithm to solve a variant of poker called heads-up limit hold’em (HULHE) (1). The authors’ strategy plays HULHE so flawlessly “as to render pointless further work on […]

 
 

Cancer: A Manifestation of “Bad Luck”?

A linear correlation equal to 0.804 suggests that 65% of the differences in cancer risk among different tissues can be explained by the total number of stem cell divisions in those tissues.  Thus, the stochastic effects of DNA replication appear to be the major contributor to cancer in humans. (Tomasetti & Vogelstein, 2015)

A positive correlation between random mutations in replicating cells and the onset of adult cancer was found at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer by Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein. That “bad luck”—that is, random mutations during DNA replication, environmental factors, and genetic disposition–contributes to cancer incidence is a well-known fact […]

 
 

Common Cold Thrives in Colder Environments

New research lends credence to the popular notion that staying warm will help you avoid catching the common cold.

Physicians have historically attributed the common cold to viral infections transmitted through the nose or mouth rather than cold weather. Prior research has in fact demonstrated that cold temperatures do not inhibit the rhinovirus, the major virus behind the common cold (1). So why does winter hail a greater propensity […]

 
 
 
 

Mission Statement

Founded in 1998, the Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science aims to increase scientific awareness within the Dartmouth community by providing an interdisciplinary forum for sharing undergraduate research and enriching scientific knowledge.

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