News

Why the Zebra Has Stripes

Why the Zebra Has Stripes

Scientists from University of California, Davis systematically examined the function of zebra stripes. From their analyses, many long-standing, but previously unconfirmed hypotheses were rejected, and it is now believed that zebra stripes serve to avoid biting flies. Prior to this research, there were five main functional hypotheses for the adaptation...

 
 

Regenerative Muscle Engineered

Regenerative Muscle Engineered

Biomedical engineers have managed to create a lab-grown skeletal muscle that behaves like the genuine tissue. It is capable of contraction, can be integrated naturally into mice, and demonstrates the power to heal itself. (1) “The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field. It’s the first...

 
 

Last Call for Limits

Last Call for Limits

As a part of the Sustainability Solutions Café series, the Black Family Visual Arts Center showed a screening of the documentary Last Call, followed by a question-and-answer session with several people involved in the making of the film, including Enrico Cerasuolo, the creator of the documentary, and Dennis Meadows, who...

 
 

Cardio activities during young age can help prevent dementia

Cardio activities during young age can help prevent dementia

  People often blame their negligence of important matters on old age. According to long-term research carried out by David Jacobs at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, however, cardio fitness activities can reduce forgetfulness that follows middle age, or the period ranging from ages 43 to 55. For the...

 
 

The Neural Substrates of Decision Making

The Neural Substrates of Decision Making

Human behavior has historically been examined under one of two perspectives. The first asserts that the choices people make are rational, consistent, and relatively unbiased by emotions. In contrast, another opinion holds that humans are inconsistent and often irrational due to limited attention spans and skewed viewpoints. Recent technological advances...

 
 
 
 
 

Mission Statement

Founded in 1998, the Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science aims to increase scientific awareness within the Dartmouth community by providing an interdisciplinary forum for sharing undergraduate research and enriching scientific knowledge.

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