News

Ancient DNA Explains Human Origins and Prehistory

Source: Wikimedia Commons 
Caption: Researchers at Harvard Medical School recently sequenced DNA samples from 15 humans from Sub-Saharan Africa to reconstruct the distribution and diversification of humans across the African continent between 1,000-8,000 years ago.






Ancient DNA Explains Human Origins and Prehistory By Bradley Fox, ‘21 Genetic information from fifteen different Ancient African individuals living between 1,000 and 8,000 years ago has given modern researchers key information on the migration patterns of ancient humans (1, 2). A recent study, released in the journal Cell on […]

 
 

Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves

A picture of the poison frog, Epipedobates anthonyi, seen in Germany (Source: Wikimedia Commons, by H. Krisp).






Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves By Amanda Jiang ’21 Summary: Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have recently discovered how the specific epibatidine toxin receptor interacts with epibatidine through studying its presence in Epipedobates anthonyi frogs. The epibatidine receptor has been found to be in the same […]

 
 

Intestinal Bacteria Are Key to Understanding Obesity

Source: Wikimedia Commons 
Caption: Danish researchers have found that bacteria in our gut play a key role in the persistence of obesity and the failure of common weight-loss dieting plans.






Intestinal Bacteria Are Key to Understanding Obesity By Bradley Fox, ‘21   Have you ever wondered about the bacteria in your gut? If not, does the gruesome intestinal image now entering your mind make you question why these small organisms are the subject of current weight-loss research? A recent study […]

 
 

A History of Mathematical Rigor

Professor Joan Richards from Brown University presented at the Dartmouth College Mathematics Colloquium on September 15.  Her lecture recounted historical changes to the idea of mathematical rigor both pre- and post-Enlightenment.






A history of mathematical rigor By Jon Alter ’21 Professor Joan Richards from Brown University presented at the Dartmouth College Mathematics Colloquium on September 15.  Her lecture recounted historical changes to the idea of mathematical rigor both pre- and post-Enlightenment.   Contemporarily, mathematical proofs require thoroughness, completeness, and exactness in […]

 
 

Novel Cleft Palate Discovery is Palate Pleasing

Comparison between a newborn with a cleft palate (left) and a newborn who underwent normal development (right) (Source: Wikimedia Commons).






Novel Cleft Palate Discovery is Palate Pleasing By Amanda Jiang ’21 New research from the University of Utah indicates that newborns have a lower risk of developing cleft palates through manipulation of the PAX9 and Wnt signaling pathways. Preliminary data from mice that have undergone in-utero treatments offer support for […]

 
 
 
 
 

Mission Statement

Founded in 1998, the Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science aims to increase scientific awareness within the Dartmouth community by providing an interdisciplinary forum for sharing undergraduate research and enriching scientific knowledge.

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