Spring 2014

Sensitization after an Injury Increases Survival

Sensitization after an Injury Increases Survival

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical School released the first piece of concrete evidence that nociceptive sensitization results in an adaptive advantage. Using squid (Doryteuthis pealeii)as their test organism, the scientists demonstrated that both behavioral and neurological changes resulting from noxious stimuli, like a minor injury, increase the likelihood...

 
 

First Potentially Habitable Earth-sized Planet Confirmed

Image Courtesy of NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech
Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kepler186f-ComparisonGraphic-20140417.jpg

Researchers at the Keck Observatory and the Gemini Observatory have discovered a planet that could very much resemble our own. Every star has a zone on its orbit in which water may exist in liquid form. This is deemed the “habitable zone” because it is thought that life cannot thrive...

 
 

Medical applications of plasma energy

In a recent class titled Healthcare and Biotechnology in the 21st Century at the Thayer School of Engineering, Richard Satava, Professor of Surgery at the University of Washington, gave a lecture on upcoming healthcare and surgery innovations. Among one of these innovations was the new use of plasma energy in...

 
 

Why the Zebra Has Stripes

Why the Zebra Has Stripes

Scientists from University of California, Davis systematically examined the function of zebra stripes. From their analyses, many long-standing, but previously unconfirmed hypotheses were rejected, and it is now believed that zebra stripes serve to avoid biting flies. Prior to this research, there were five main functional hypotheses for the adaptation...

 
 

Regenerative Muscle Engineered

Regenerative Muscle Engineered

Biomedical engineers have managed to create a lab-grown skeletal muscle that behaves like the genuine tissue. It is capable of contraction, can be integrated naturally into mice, and demonstrates the power to heal itself. (1) “The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field. It’s the first...

 
 
 
 
 

Mission Statement

Founded in 1998, the Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science aims to increase scientific awareness within the Dartmouth community by providing an interdisciplinary forum for sharing undergraduate research and enriching scientific knowledge.

Want to join the DUJS staff?

All the undergraduates of Dartmouth College are welcome to join our staff. Our staff includes students interested in writing, editing, photography, graphics, web design, and more! Please contact us to be added to our e-mail list. Staff meetings are Thursday evenings at 8 pm in Carson L02.