Winter 2009

Antibiotic Resistance of Tuberculosis

Antibiotic Resistance of Tuberculosis






Tuberculosis (TB) has affected human beings since Neolithic times (1).  In ancient Greece it was known as phthisis, which means “wasting.” During the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe it caused the “White Plague” and was known as consumption, accounting for 25 percent of all adult deaths during this period […]

 
 

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: HPV and HIV

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: HPV and HIV






Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: Human Papillomavirus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus From influenza to smallpox to Ebola, viruses, some of the smallest and most intriguing infectious agents, have long plagued society. To scientists, understanding viral mechanisms of infection is critical to learning how to combat them. The 2008 Nobel […]

 
 

Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Green Fluorescent Protein

Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Green Fluorescent Protein






As visual creatures, humans believe what they see. We rely on our vision for macroscopic observations. Vast advances in microscopy now also enable visualization of cellular and sub-cellular structures. However, even the best microscopes cannot directly view molecular-level processes such as gene expression or protein interaction in vivo. In 1962, […]

 
 

Nobel Prize in Physics: Broken Symmetry

Nobel Prize in Physics: Broken Symmetry






Why can the Universe exist as it is now? Physicists have been striving to answer this question. A proposed theory is “broken symmetry.” In 2008, the Nobel Prize committee recognized significant contribution of three Japanese scientists in the field of symmetry. On October 7, 2008, the Royal Swedish Academy of […]

 
 

Interview: In the Field With an Arctic Pioneer

Interview: In the Field With an Arctic Pioneer






Ross Virginia is highly involved at Dartmouth College as a professor of environmental studies, the director of the Institute of Arctic Studies, as well as the principle investigator of the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program IGERT. Furthermore, his influence extends even to Antarctica, where a valley is named […]

 
 
 
 
 

Mission Statement

Founded in 1998, the Dartmouth Undergraduate Journal of Science aims to increase scientific awareness within the Dartmouth community by providing an interdisciplinary forum for sharing undergraduate research and enriching scientific knowledge.

Want to join the DUJS staff?

All the undergraduates of Dartmouth College are welcome to join our staff. Our staff includes students interested in writing, editing, photography, graphics, web design, and more! Please contact us to be added to our e-mail list. Staff meetings are Thursday evenings at 8 pm in Carson L02.